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Blacklegged Tick

Blacklegged Ticks

What Are Blacklegged Ticks?

Blacklegged ticks, scientifically known as Ixodes scapularis in the eastern United States and Ixodes pacificus in the western United States, are parasitic arachnids that are of particular concern due to their role as vectors of several diseases. They are more commonly known as deer ticks. These ticks are named for the black coloration on their legs, which is in contrast to their reddish-brown bodies.

Here is a comprehensive overview of blacklegged ticks:

  • Physical Characteristics: Blacklegged ticks are relatively small, with adult females measuring approximately 3 to 5 mm in length, and adult males being slightly smaller. These ticks have a flattened, oval-shaped body. The distinguishing feature is their dark, almost black, legs in contrast to their lighter body color.
  • Habitat and Geographic Distribution: Blacklegged ticks are primarily found in wooded areas, grassy fields, and brushy environments. They require high humidity to survive and are commonly found in regions with a combination of suitable habitats, such as the eastern and north-central United States, and the western coastal areas.
  • Life Cycle: The life cycle of blacklegged ticks includes four stages: egg, larva, nymph, and adult. They require a blood meal at each of the three active stages (larva, nymph, and adult). The larvae and nymphs are smaller and have six legs, while the adult ticks have eight legs. The nymphal stage is often the most responsible for transmitting diseases to humans.
  • Disease Transmission: Blacklegged ticks are infamous for transmitting several diseases, including Lyme disease (caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi), anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and Powassan virus. Lyme disease, in particular, is the most well-known and widespread tick-borne illness in the United States.
  • Feeding Behavior: These ticks attach themselves to hosts, such as mammals (particularly deer and rodents) and birds, to obtain a blood meal. They use specialized mouthparts to pierce the host's skin and feed on their blood. The feeding process can take several days, during which the tick can transmit diseases if it is infected.
  • Prevention and Control: To prevent tick bites and reduce the risk of tick-borne diseases, individuals are advised to use tick repellents, wear protective clothing, perform regular tick checks after outdoor activities, and consider landscape modifications to create a less tick-friendly environment. In some high-risk areas, vaccination for Lyme disease may also be recommended.
  • Research and Monitoring: Blacklegged ticks are subject to extensive research and monitoring efforts, particularly in regions with a high incidence of tick-borne diseases. Scientists study tick behavior, host relationships, and pathogen prevalence to better understand and combat the diseases they transmit.

Blacklegged ticks, commonly known as deer ticks, are small arachnids found in wooded and grassy areas, known for their role in transmitting diseases such as Lyme disease. Understanding their biology and implementing preventive measures is crucial for reducing the risks associated with these ticks and the diseases they carry.

What Do Blacklegged Ticks Look Like?

Blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the eastern United States and Ixodes pacificus in the western United States), also known as deer ticks, have distinct physical characteristics that can help in their identification. Here is a description of what blacklegged ticks look like:

Size and Shape:

Blacklegged ticks are relatively small compared to other tick species. Adult females typically measure between 3 to 5 mm in length, while adult males are slightly smaller. Their body has an oval shape and is somewhat flattened.

Coloration:

The most distinguishing feature of blacklegged ticks is their black legs. These ticks get their common name "blacklegged" from this feature. The rest of their body is a reddish-brown color.

Mouthparts:

Blacklegged ticks have specialized mouthparts that they use to pierce the skin of their host and feed on their blood. The mouthparts include a pair of barbed palps and a hypostome, which allows them to firmly anchor to the host during feeding.

Number of Legs:

Blacklegged ticks, like all arachnids, have eight legs in their adult stage. In the larval and nymphal stages, they have six legs.

Life Stages:

The ticks go through four life stages: egg, larva, nymph, and adult. The larval and nymphal stages have a more translucent appearance and are smaller, making them harder to spot than the larger, more noticeable adult ticks.

Feeding Behavior:

While feeding on a host, their bodies become engorged with blood, causing them to swell and become more visible.

Gender Differences:

Adult male blacklegged ticks are generally smaller and have a more slender appearance compared to the larger, blood-engorged adult females. Adult males often have more of the characteristic black coloring on their legs.

Identifying blacklegged ticks is important because they are known to transmit diseases such as Lyme disease, making awareness and proper tick removal essential for individuals who spend time in tick-prone areas. Their unique combination of reddish-brown bodies and black legs is a key feature to recognize them.

Where Are Blacklegged Ticks Found?

Blacklegged ticks, also known as deer ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the eastern United States and Ixodes pacificus in the western United States), are typically found in specific types of habitats that provide the necessary conditions for their survival. Here is a description of the habitats where you are likely to encounter blacklegged ticks:

  • Wooded Areas: Blacklegged ticks are commonly found in forests and wooded regions. They prefer habitats with a dense canopy of trees and shrubs, which offer them protection from desiccation (drying out) and help maintain the humidity they require.
  • Grassy Fields: Ticks are often found in fields and grassy meadows. They can be present in areas with tall grasses, as this vegetation provides suitable cover for them and makes it easier to latch onto passing hosts.
  • Brushy Environments: Areas with dense undergrowth, shrubs, and low vegetation provide ideal hiding spots for blacklegged ticks. They often quest for hosts by climbing onto these plants and waiting for animals or humans to pass by.
  • Peri-Urban and Suburban Settings: Blacklegged ticks can also be found in suburban or peri-urban areas, especially where properties back onto wooded areas or have abundant vegetation. Ticks may migrate from the natural environment into these areas, increasing the risk of human exposure.
  • Coastal Regions: In some regions, particularly in the northeastern United States, blacklegged ticks are prevalent in coastal areas with a mix of woods, tall grasses, and saltmarshes.
  • Trail Systems: Hiking and nature trails that pass through wooded or grassy areas can be prime locations for encountering blacklegged ticks, especially during the warmer months when these ticks are most active.
  • Wildlife Habitats: Ticks may also be found in areas where deer and other host animals are abundant, as these animals serve as a source of blood meals for the ticks.

The presence of blacklegged ticks can vary by geographic region and local environmental conditions. They are most active during the spring, summer, and early fall when temperatures and humidity levels are conducive to their survival. When spending time in these types of habitats, individuals should take precautions, such as wearing appropriate clothing, using tick repellents, and conducting thorough tick checks after outdoor activities, to reduce the risk of tick bites and tick-borne diseases, like Lyme disease.

What Is The Life Cycle Of Blacklegged Ticks?

The life cycle of blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the eastern United States and Ixodes pacificus in the western United States), commonly known as deer ticks, involves four distinct stages: egg, larva, nymph, and adult. Here is the life cycle of blacklegged ticks:

Egg Stage:

  • The life cycle begins when an adult female tick lays eggs. Female ticks typically lay several thousand eggs at a time, usually in a sheltered area within their habitat.
  • The eggs are relatively small, measuring around 0.5 mm in size.
  • After laying the eggs, the female typically dies.

Larval Stage:

  • When the eggs hatch, the larvae emerge. Larvae have six legs and are very tiny, usually measuring less than 1 mm in size.
  • During this stage, the larvae are not infected with any diseases. They seek their first blood meal by attaching themselves to a host, which can be a small mammal or bird.
  • After feeding, the larvae drop off the host and molt into the nymphal stage.

Nymphal Stage:

  • Nymphs have eight legs and are larger than the larvae but still relatively small, measuring around 1-2 mm in size.
  • Nymphs are typically active during the spring and early summer.
  • At this stage, they seek a second blood meal, often from a larger host, which can be a small mammal or bird.
  • If the nymph feeds on an infected host, it can acquire pathogens like the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease.

Adult Stage:

  • Nymphs molt into the adult stage. Adult females are larger than adult males.
  • Adult males are more slender and measure around 2-3 mm in length, while adult females, after a blood meal, can reach 3-5 mm in length.
  • Adult ticks are most active during the late fall and early spring.
  • Both male and female adults require a blood meal. Female ticks, after feeding, become engorged and can lay thousands of eggs before dying.

The entire life cycle can take one to two years to complete, depending on environmental conditions and the availability of hosts. Blacklegged ticks are most concerning during the nymphal and adult stages, as they are more likely to transmit diseases to humans and animals. Preventative measures, such as tick checks and protective clothing, are essential during periods of tick activity to reduce the risk of tick bites and tick-borne diseases.

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Do Blacklegged Ticks Bite?

Yes, blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the eastern United States and Ixodes pacificus in the western United States), commonly known as deer ticks, do indeed bite. Ticks are blood-feeding parasites, and their bites are an essential part of their life cycle and reproductive process. Here's how blacklegged ticks bite:

  • Feeding Behavior: Blacklegged ticks, like other tick species, are obligate blood-feeding parasites. They require a blood meal at each of their active life stages, which include the larval, nymphal, and adult stages. During the feeding process, they attach themselves to a host and pierce the host's skin to access their blood.
  • Attachment: The tick uses specialized mouthparts, which include a barbed hypostome and palps, to anchor themselves securely to the host. They may take several hours to fully embed their mouthparts in the host's skin.
  • Feeding Time: The duration of feeding can vary but typically lasts for several days. As the tick feeds, it ingests the host's blood, which provides essential nutrients for its growth, development, and reproduction.
  • Engorgement: During feeding, the tick's body becomes engorged with blood, causing it to swell. Engorged ticks are often more noticeable than unfed ones.
  • Disease Transmission: If an adult blacklegged tick is infected with a disease-causing pathogen, such as the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (which causes Lyme disease), it can transmit the pathogen to the host during the feeding process. Nymphal ticks are also capable of disease transmission.
  • Health Concerns: Blacklegged ticks are of particular concern because they are known vectors for several tick-borne diseases, especially Lyme disease, but also anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and Powassan virus. Bites from infected ticks can lead to these diseases in humans and other animals.
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Frequently Asked Questions About Blacklegged Ticks

Are blacklegged ticks dangerous?

Blacklegged ticks, also known as deer ticks, are considered dangerous due to their ability to transmit diseases. These ticks are common in many parts of the United States, particularly in the Northeast, Midwest, and mid-Atlantic regions.

One of the main concerns with blacklegged ticks is that they can transmit Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that can cause a range of symptoms, including fever, fatigue, joint pain, and a characteristic rash. If left untreated, Lyme disease can lead to more serious complications, such as chronic joint pain, neurological problems, and heart problems.

In addition to Lyme disease, blacklegged ticks can also transmit other diseases, such as anaplasmosis and babesiosis. Anaplasmosis is a bacterial infection that can cause fever, chills, muscle aches, and other flu-like symptoms. Babesiosis is a parasitic infection that can cause flu-like symptoms, as well as anemia and other complications.

The dangers of blacklegged ticks are not limited to humans. These ticks can also transmit diseases to animals, including dogs, cats, and other wildlife. In dogs, Lyme disease can cause symptoms such as lameness, joint pain, and fatigue. In severe cases, it can even lead to kidney failure.

To protect yourself and your pets from blacklegged ticks, it is important to take steps to prevent tick bites. This includes wearing long-sleeved clothing when spending time in areas where ticks are common, using insect repellent that contains DEET or another EPA-registered ingredient, and checking your body and your pets for ticks after spending time outdoors.

If you do find a tick attached to your skin, it is important to remove it as soon as possible. To do so, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin's surface as possible and pull upward with steady, even pressure. After removing the tick, clean the bite area with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.

Blacklegged ticks are considered dangerous due to their ability to transmit diseases such as Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and babesiosis. To protect yourself and your pets from these ticks, it is important to take steps to prevent tick bites and to remove any ticks that you find as soon as possible. If you develop any symptoms of a tick-borne illness, such as fever, fatigue, or joint pain, be sure to seek medical attention right away.

Why do I have a blacklegged tick problem?

An infestation of blacklegged ticks, also known as deer ticks, can be a frustrating and potentially dangerous problem. These ticks are common in many parts of the United States, particularly in the Northeast, Midwest, and mid-Atlantic regions.

One possible reason for an infestation of blacklegged ticks is that you live in an area where these ticks are common. Blacklegged ticks prefer wooded and grassy areas and are most active in the spring and fall months. If you live near a wooded area or spend a lot of time outdoors in areas where ticks are common, you may be more likely to experience an infestation.

Another possible reason for an infestation of blacklegged ticks is that you have a lot of wildlife on your property. Blacklegged ticks often feed on deer, mice, and other small mammals, and if you have a lot of these animals on your property, you may also have a lot of ticks. Additionally, if you have pets that spend time outdoors, they may bring ticks into your home.

Poor landscaping practices can also contribute to an infestation of blacklegged ticks. If you have tall grass, weeds, or other overgrown vegetation on your property, it can provide a habitat for ticks. Keeping your lawn mowed and clearing away brush and debris can help reduce the number of ticks on your property.

How do I get rid of blacklegged ticks?

If you have blacklegged ticks on your property or if you have been bitten by one, you may be wondering how to get rid of them. Getting rid of blacklegged ticks requires a multifaceted approach that includes eliminating their habitat, using tick control products, checking yourself and your pets for ticks, and considering natural tick repellents. By following these five steps, you can significantly reduce the risk of tick bites and the potential for tick-borne illnesses.

  1. Remove tick habitats: The first step in getting rid of blacklegged ticks is to eliminate their habitat. This can be done by keeping your lawn mowed, removing leaf litter and brush, and trimming back trees and bushes. You can also create a barrier between your yard and wooded areas by installing a three-foot wide border of wood chips or gravel.
  2. Use tick control products: There are a variety of tick control products available, including pesticides, tick tubes, and tick-repelling plants. Pesticides can be applied to your yard by a professional pest control company or you can apply them yourself using a garden hose sprayer. Tick tubes are small tubes filled with cotton that have been treated with a tick-killing pesticide. They can be placed in areas where mice are likely to travel, as mice are one of the primary hosts of blacklegged ticks. Tick-repelling plants such as lavender, rosemary, and eucalyptus can also be planted in your yard to help keep ticks away.
  3. Consider using natural tick repellents: There are a variety of natural tick repellents that can be used to repel blacklegged ticks. These include essential oils such as peppermint, rosemary, and lemongrass. You can mix a few drops of these oils with water in a spray bottle and spray it on your skin and clothing before going outside.
  4. Check yourself and your pets for ticks: Even with the best tick control measures, it's still possible to get bitten by a tick. To reduce the risk of tick-borne illnesses, it's important to check yourself and your pets for ticks after spending time outdoors. If you find a tick, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin's surface as possible and pull upward with steady, even pressure. After removing the tick, clean the bite area with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.
  5. Consult a professional: If you are dealing with a severe infestation of blacklegged ticks, or if you are unable to get rid of them using the methods listed above, it may be necessary to consult a professional pest control company. They can assess your property, recommend a course of action, and apply tick control products safely and effectively.

How can I prevent blacklegged ticks in the future?

Preventing blacklegged ticks, also known as deer ticks, can help reduce the risk of contracting tick-borne illnesses such as Lyme disease. Here are seven measures you can take to prevent blacklegged ticks in the future:

  1. Wear protective clothing: Wear light-colored clothing with long sleeves and pants. Tuck your pants into your socks or boots, and wear closed-toe shoes. This will help prevent ticks from getting on your skin and attaching themselves.
  2. Use insect repellent: Apply insect repellent containing DEET or permethrin to your skin and clothing. Repellents with at least 20% DEET are effective against ticks. Permethrin can be applied to clothing and footwear, but should not be used directly on skin. Follow the instructions on the label carefully.
  3. Stay on designated trails: Avoid walking through tall grass, brushy areas, and leaf litter where ticks are likely to be found. Stick to designated trails when hiking, and avoid contact with vegetation along the trail.
  4. Check for ticks: After spending time outdoors, check your body for ticks. Pay special attention to the hairline, behind the ears, and under the arms. Check your pets for ticks as well, as they can bring them into your home. Use a mirror to check hard-to-reach areas.
  5. Remove ticks promptly: If you find a tick on your body, remove it promptly using fine-tipped tweezers. Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible and pull upward with steady, even pressure. Clean the bite area with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.
  6. Create a tick-free environment: Keep your lawn mowed, remove leaf litter and brush, and trim back trees and bushes. Create a barrier between your yard and wooded areas by installing a three-foot wide border of wood chips or gravel.
  7. Use tick control products: Consider using tick control products such as pesticides or tick tubes to reduce the number of ticks in your yard. These products can be applied by a professional pest control company or you can apply them yourself using a garden hose sprayer.

By following these measures, you can help prevent blacklegged ticks and reduce the risk of tick-borne illnesses. It's important to be vigilant and check yourself and your pets regularly, as well as taking steps to create a tick-free environment. If you develop symptoms after being bitten by a tick, seek medical attention promptly.

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