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Fleas: Small, Wingless, Biting Insects That Spread Disease

Fleas are small, wingless insects that are known for their ability to infest pets and cause itching and irritation. They are about 1/8 inch long and have a reddish-brown color. They have a flattened body shape and are covered in tiny hairs, which helps them to move quickly through an animal's fur.

Fleas are ectoparasites, meaning they live on the outside of an animal's body. They feed on the blood of their host, which can include dogs, cats, rodents, and even humans. When they bite, they can cause itching and irritation, which can lead to skin infections if the bites are scratched excessively. Fleas can also transmit diseases, such as tapeworms, to their host.

Fleas reproduce quickly, laying their eggs on the host animal or in the surrounding environment. The eggs are small and white, and can easily fall off the animal and into carpets, furniture, and other areas of the home. The eggs can also be spread by other animals, such as rodents, which can make it difficult to control a flea infestation.

Fleas have a complex life cycle, which includes an egg, larval, pupal, and adult stage. The entire cycle can take as little as two weeks to several months, depending on the environment. This means that a flea infestation can grow quickly if left untreated.

To prevent a flea infestation, it is important to keep your pets treated with flea and tick preventatives, vacuum your home regularly, and maintain a clean yard. If you suspect you have a flea infestation, it's important to seek help from a professional or veterinarian, as fleas can be difficult to eliminate on your own.

Fleas As Pests

Fleas are considered pests for several reasons:

  1. They are blood-sucking parasites that feed on the blood of mammals, including humans and pets. This causes itching, irritation and can lead to skin infections if the bites are scratched excessively.
  2. Fleas reproduce quickly and are known for their ability to infest homes, carpets, and furniture. This can make it difficult to control a flea infestation once it has started.
  3. Fleas can transmit diseases, such as tapeworms, to their host. This can cause serious health problems for both pets and humans.
  4. Fleas can also cause allergic reactions in some pets and humans, known as flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) which can lead to severe itching, redness and hair loss.
  5. They are resilient and hard to eliminate. Fleas can survive in a variety of conditions, they can live indoors or outdoors, they can survive in cold or warm weather and can remain hidden in carpets and furniture.
  6. Fleas are not only a nuisance to pets and humans, but they can also be a nuisance to the environment by affecting the population of certain wild animals.

All these reasons combined make fleas a highly unwanted pest, which can be hard to control once they infest your home or pet. It's important to take preventive measures to avoid an infestation and seek professional help if you suspect you have a flea infestation.

What Diseases Do Fleas Spread?

Fleas can spread a variety of diseases to both animals and humans. Some of the most common diseases spread by fleas include:

  1. Plague: This is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and is most commonly spread by fleas that have bitten infected rats. Plague can cause fever, chills, weakness, and swollen lymph nodes, and can be fatal if not treated promptly with antibiotics.
  2. Murine typhus: This is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia typhi and is spread by fleas that have bitten infected rats. Symptoms include fever, headache, nausea, and muscle aches.
  3. Tapeworms: Fleas can carry tapeworms, which can infect animals and humans if the fleas are ingested. Symptoms of tapeworm infection can include diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss.
  4. Anemia: Fleas can cause severe blood loss in animals, particularly in young or small animals, leading to anemia.

It is important to note that these are some of the most common diseases spread by fleas, but there are other diseases that can also be spread by fleas. It is essential to keep your pets and the environment free of fleas and other parasites.

What Types Of Fleas Are There?

There are several types of fleas, but the most common types that infest pets and homes include:

  1. Cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis): This is the most common type of flea found on cats and dogs. It is a small, reddish-brown insect that can also infest other mammals, including humans.
  2. Dog flea (Ctenocephalides canis): This type of flea is found on dogs and can also infest other mammals, including cats and humans.
  3. Human flea (Pulex irritans): This type of flea is found on humans and can also infest other mammals, including dogs and cats.
  4. Rat flea (Xenopsylla cheopis): This type of flea is found on rats and can also infest other mammals, including humans.
  5. Bird flea (Ceratophyllus gallinae): This type of flea infests poultry, pigeons and other birds.

All these fleas have similar characteristics and life cycles, but they may have different preferences for hosts, and different methods of control may be needed for each species. It's important to consult a veterinarian or pest control professional to determine the specific type of flea that is infesting your pet or home, and to develop an appropriate treatment plan.

The Flea Life Cycle

Fleas go through four stages in their life cycle: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

  1. Egg: Adult fleas lay tiny, white, oval-shaped eggs on the host animal or in the environment. They can lay up to 50 eggs per day. These eggs fall off the host animal and into the environment, where they can hatch in 1-10 days depending on the conditions.
  2. Larva: Once the eggs hatch, they enter the larval stage. Flea larvae are small, legless, and whitish in color. They feed on organic debris, such as dead skin cells, hair, and feces from adult fleas. They can be found in areas where the host animal spends most of its time, such as carpets, pet beds, and furniture. The larvae stage lasts for about 5-11 days.
  3. Pupa: After the larvae stage, the fleas enter the pupal stage. Pupae are enclosed in cocoons made of silk and debris from the environment. They can be found in the same areas as the larvae. Inside the cocoon, the flea undergoes metamorphosis and develops into an adult. The pupal stage lasts for 7-14 days.
  4. Adult: Once the pupae stage is complete, the flea emerges as an adult. Adult fleas are small, reddish-brown insects that are wingless. They are adapted for jumping and clinging to their host. Once they find a host, they will feed on its blood and start reproducing. The adult stage can last several months.

The entire flea life cycle, from egg to adult, can be completed in as little as 2-3 weeks under ideal conditions, which is why fleas can reproduce quickly and infestations can become severe in a short period of time. It's important to understand the flea life cycle in order to effectively control an infestation. Breaking any part of the life cycle can prevent or halt the population growth.

How To Prevent Fleas From Infesting Your Home

Preventing fleas from infesting your home can be challenging, but there are several steps you can take to reduce the risk of an infestation:

  1. Keep your pets treated: Regularly treating your pets with flea preventatives, such as topicals, oral medications, or collars, is the most effective way to prevent fleas from infesting your home. Be sure to follow the instructions provided by your veterinarian or the product manufacturer.
  2. Vacuum regularly: Vacuuming your carpets, furniture, and pet beds regularly can help to remove flea eggs, larvae, and adult fleas from your home. Be sure to empty the vacuum cleaner bag or canister after each use to prevent the fleas from escaping.
  3. Launder bedding and clothing: Wash all bedding and clothing that may have come into contact with fleas in hot water and use a high heat setting in the dryer.
  4. Keep your yard clean: Fleas can live and reproduce in outdoor environments, so it's important to keep your yard clean and free of debris. Regularly mow your lawn, remove piles of leaves or other organic debris, and trim bushes or trees near your home.
  5. Use natural or chemical repellents: There are a variety of natural or chemical repellents available, such as diatomaceous earth, boric acid, or essential oils, that can help to prevent fleas from infesting your home. Be sure to follow the instructions provided by the product manufacturer and use them safely.
  6. Seek professional help: If you are unable to prevent or control a flea infestation on your own, it may be necessary to seek help from a pest control professional. They will be able to provide more advanced treatments and offer a better assessment of the infestation.

It's important to note that preventing flea infestations requires a combination of methods, and it can be challenging to eliminate an established infestation. If you suspect that you have a flea infestation, it's best to contact a pest control professional as soon as possible.

How To Prevent Fleas From Infesting Your Pets

Preventing fleas from infesting your pets can be done by taking the following steps:

  1. Use flea preventatives: The most effective way to prevent fleas from infesting your pets is to use a flea preventative. There are several types of flea preventatives available, including topicals, oral medications, and collars. Be sure to follow the instructions provided by your veterinarian or the product manufacturer.
  2. Keep your pet groomed: Regularly grooming your pet can help to remove fleas and their eggs from their coat. Brushing or combing your pet's hair regularly can also help to distribute natural oils throughout their coat, making it less attractive to fleas.
  3. Keep your yard clean: Fleas can live and reproduce in outdoor environments, so it's important to keep your yard clean and free of debris. Regularly mow your lawn, remove piles of leaves or other organic debris, and trim bushes or trees near your home.
  4. Vacuum regularly: Vacuuming your carpets, furniture, and pet beds regularly can help to remove flea eggs, larvae, and adult fleas from your home. Be sure to empty the vacuum cleaner bag or canister after each use to prevent the fleas from escaping.
  5. Launder bedding and clothing: Wash all bedding and clothing that may have come into contact with fleas in hot water and use a high heat setting in the dryer.
  6. Keep an eye on your pet: Regularly inspecting your pet for signs of fleas, such as excessive scratching, biting or licking at their skin, or small black specks on their coat.
  7. Seek professional help: If you are unable to prevent or control a flea infestation on your own, it may be necessary to seek help from a veterinarian or a pest control professional. They will be able to provide more advanced treatments and offer a better assessment of the infestation.

It's important to note that preventing flea infestations requires a combination of methods, and it can be challenging to eliminate an established infestation. If you suspect that your pet has fleas, it's best to contact a veterinarian as soon as possible.

How To Prevent Fleas From Infesting Your Yard

Preventing fleas from infesting your yard can be done by taking the following steps:

  1. Keep your yard clean: Fleas can live and reproduce in outdoor environments, so it's important to keep your yard clean and free of debris. Regularly mow your lawn, remove piles of leaves or other organic debris, and trim bushes or trees near your home.
  2. Keep pets groomed: Regularly grooming your pets can help to remove fleas and their eggs from their coat before they have a chance to infest your yard.
  3. Use insecticides: You can use insecticides to eliminate fleas in your yard. Choose an insecticide that specifically targets fleas, and be sure to follow the instructions provided by the product manufacturer.
  4. Use nematodes: Beneficial nematodes can be used to control flea populations in your yard. These tiny worms feed on flea larvae, preventing them from maturing into adult fleas.
  5. Keep an eye on the weather: Fleas thrive in warm, humid weather, so it's important to be vigilant during the summer months.
  6. Treating the surrounding areas: Fleas can come from surrounding areas such as parks, woods, or even from your neighbor's yard. It's a good idea to treat the surroundings as well as your own yard.
  7. Seek professional help: If you are unable to prevent or control a flea infestation in your yard on your own, it may be necessary to seek help from a pest control professional. They will be able to provide more advanced treatments and offer a better assessment of the infestation.

It's important to note that preventing flea infestations in your yard requires a combination of methods, and it can be challenging to eliminate an established infestation. If you suspect that you have a flea infestation in your yard, it's best to contact a pest control professional as soon as possible.

Treating Fleas On Pets

Treating fleas on pets can be done in a number of ways, including:

  1. Topical treatments: These treatments come in the form of spot-on products that are applied directly to the skin of the pet. They work by killing fleas and their eggs before they have a chance to reproduce.
  2. Oral medications: Oral medications, such as tablets and chews, can be used to kill fleas and their eggs. These products are typically more convenient than topical treatments, as they do not require regular application.
  3. Shampoos and sprays: Shampoos and sprays can be used to kill fleas on contact. These products should be used in conjunction with other flea treatments to ensure that all fleas are eliminated.
  4. Collars: Flea collars release chemicals that repel fleas and kill them on contact. These collars can be a good option for pets who are prone to flea infestations.
  5. Vacuuming: Regular vacuuming of carpets, furniture and other surfaces can help to remove fleas and their eggs from the environment.
  6. Laundering: Laundering bedding, pet clothing and other items that your pet comes into contact with can help to remove fleas and their eggs.

It's important to consult your vet to determine which flea treatment is best for your pet as some pets may have an allergic reaction to certain products. Also, to ensure that the treatment is effective, it's important to follow the instructions provided by the product manufacturer and to use the product as directed.

Additionally, it's important to keep up with the treatment even after the fleas are gone to prevent them from coming back. This may involve regular vacuuming, vacuuming and laundering, and treating your yard as well as your pet.

Treating Fleas In The Home

Treating fleas in the home can be done in a number of ways, including:

  1. Vacuuming: Regular vacuuming of carpets, furniture and other surfaces can help to remove fleas and their eggs from the environment. This should be done regularly, especially in areas where pets spend a lot of time.
  2. Steam cleaning: Steam cleaning carpets and furniture can help to kill fleas and their eggs. This method is particularly effective for killing fleas and their eggs that may be hiding in hard-to-reach areas.
  3. Laundering: Laundering bedding, clothing and other items that may come into contact with fleas can help to remove fleas and their eggs.
  4. Pesticides: Pesticides specifically designed for flea control can be used to treat the home. These products can be applied to carpets, furniture and other surfaces to kill fleas and their eggs.
  5. Flea traps: Flea traps can be used to trap fleas and monitor the effectiveness of flea control measures. These traps use heat and light to attract fleas and keep them trapped.
  6. Flea combs: Flea combs can be used to remove fleas and their eggs from pets. This is a good way to remove fleas and their eggs that may be hiding in the pet's fur.

It's important to consider the size of your home and the infestation level when choosing a method of treatment. A professional pest control service may be necessary for severe infestations. Additionally, it's important to keep up with the treatment even after the fleas are gone to prevent them from coming back. This may involve regular vacuuming, vacuuming and laundering, and treating your yard as well as your pet.

Treating Fleas In The Yard

There are several ways to treat fleas in the yard, including the use of pesticides, natural remedies, and maintenance techniques.

  1. Pesticides: You can use insecticides specifically designed to kill fleas. These can be in the form of sprays, granules, or foggers. Be sure to follow the instructions on the label carefully.
  2. Natural remedies: There are a number of natural remedies that can be used to repel or kill fleas in the yard. These include using diatomaceous earth, cedar chips, and citrus sprays.
  3. Maintenance techniques: Regularly mowing the lawn, removing debris and keeping the yard clean can also help in reducing flea populations.

It is important to keep in mind that fleas can also come from pets, so be sure to treat them as well and keep them groomed and clean.

Over The Counter And Prescription Flea Treatments

Over-the-counter (OTC) flea treatments and prescription flea treatments are both options for controlling fleas on pets.

  1. Over-the-counter flea treatments: OTC flea treatments are available at most pet stores and online. They include topical treatments, sprays, shampoos, and collars. These products often contain pyrethrins or pyrethroids, which are insecticides that kill fleas on contact. Some OTC flea treatments also contain insect growth regulators (IGRs) that prevent flea eggs from hatching.
  2. Prescription flea treatments: Prescription flea treatments are available from veterinarians and require a prescription. These products often contain stronger active ingredients or a combination of active ingredients that provide a higher level of flea control. Some prescription flea treatments also contain IGRs.

It is important to follow the instructions on the label carefully, and to consult with a veterinarian before using any flea treatment product on your pet, particularly if your pet has any health conditions or if you're using other medications on your pet.

What are fleas?

Fleas are one of every homeowner’s worst nightmares. Challenging to prevent and even more challenging to eliminate, these wingless insects are never welcome on our properties. The flea is tiny in size, but the negative impact they create for us and our pets is big.

The flea’s sole food source is blood from warm-blooded animals. Some of their preferred hosts include rodents, rabbits, raccoons, deer, skunks, dogs, and cats. Fleas will bite us and feed on our blood, but we aren’t their preferred hosts; instead, they would like to spend their lives on the back of an animal host. 

The flea’s physical features include an oval body flattened from side to side, covered in a hard shell, which helps prevent them from being squished! They have large back legs, which provide them with excellent jumping capabilities. Their specialized biting mouthparts allow fleas to easily penetrate the skin of a host and feed on their blood.

What do fleas look like?

Fleas are small, wingless insects that are typically brown or reddish-brown in color. They are about 1/16 to 1/8 inch long, and have a flattened, laterally compressed body shape. They have long, slender legs that allow them to jump great distances, and their bodies are covered in tiny, stiff hairs. Fleas have piercing-sucking mouthparts, which they use to feed on the blood of their host. They can be difficult to see with the naked eye, but may be visible as small, dark specks on the skin or fur of an infested animal or in areas where they tend to congregate, such as bedding or carpets.

Are fleas dangerous?

Fleas are parasitic pests with no business being in our yards, homes, or worse, on us or our pets. After biting us to feed, left behind is a red itchy welt that can be continuously scratched open and lead to a secondary infection. Those allergic to their saliva can experience severe and uncomfortable skin rashes, and in our pets, excessive itching can lead to hair loss and sores. 

Fleas also cause other health risks. These insects are an intermediate host for tapeworms. They carry and spread tapeworm larvae to both people and animals. While the spread of diseases by fleas is not a huge concern, they can spread some diseases, including cat scratch fever, murine typhus, and even plague.

Can fleas transmit diseases to humans or pets?

Fleas can transmit diseases to both humans and pets, although it is relatively rare.

In pets, fleas can transmit certain diseases such as flea-borne typhus, which is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia felis. This disease can cause symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle aches, and rash in humans. Pets may not show signs of the disease.

Fleas can also transmit tapeworms to pets. Pets can get tapeworms by ingesting an infected flea while grooming themselves. Tapeworms can cause weight loss, diarrhea, and abdominal discomfort in pets.

In humans, flea bites can cause itching and redness, and in some cases, an allergic reaction. In rare cases, flea bites can also cause a condition called flea-bite dermatitis, which is characterized by itchy, red, and swollen skin.

It's important to note that the risk of fleas transmitting diseases to humans or pets is relatively low, but regular flea control measures can help to prevent infestations and the potential transmission of diseases.

How do fleas infest a home or pet?

Fleas can infest a home or pet in a variety of ways. Some common methods of infestation include:

  1. Through contact with other infested animals: Fleas can easily transfer from one animal to another, so if your pet comes into contact with an infested animal, they may become infested as well.
  2. Through contact with infested areas: Fleas can also infest a pet or home by coming into contact with an area that is already infested, such as a park, a kennel, or a neighbor's yard.
  3. Through eggs and larvae: Fleas lay their eggs on the host animal, which can fall off and hatch in the environment, such as carpets, bedding or furniture.
  4. Through wild animals: Fleas can also infest a home or pet through wild animals such as squirrels, raccoons or opossums that may have fleas and come into contact with the house or pets.

Preventing flea infestation is key, regular grooming, cleaning and vacuuming the house, yard and pets can help prevent fleas. Also, using flea prevention products on pets such as collars, sprays or topical treatments can help keep fleas off of them.

Why do I have a flea problem?

There are many ways that fleas can become a problem in either our outdoor or indoor spaces.

  • They can be introduced into our yards by wild animals.
  • Stray pets or wandering neighborhood pets could bring fleas into your yard.
  • Rodents that have moved into your home could bring fleas with them and cause an infestation.
  • Fleas, or their eggs or larvae, can be introduced into your home on used furniture, rugs, or other fabric items.

How long do fleas live?

The lifespan of a flea can vary depending on several factors, including the species of flea, the environment, and the availability of a host.

Adult fleas typically live for about 2 to 3 months on a host. During this time, female fleas can lay hundreds of eggs.

The eggs typically hatch within 1 to 10 days, depending on the temperature and humidity. The flea larvae then develop over the next 5 to 11 days before spinning a cocoon and becoming pupae.

The pupal stage can last anywhere from 5 days to several months, depending on the conditions. The fleas will remain in the cocoon until they sense vibrations or heat, which indicates the presence of a host.

Once the flea emerges as an adult, it will immediately search for a host to feed on. Once it finds a host, it will spend the majority of its remaining lifespan on that host, reproducing and laying eggs.

Where will I find fleas?

You'll primarily find adult fleas on the backs of their hosts, feeding, and breeding, while the eggs, developing larvae, and new adults will be on the ground. 

Outside, fleas that aren't living on a host yet inhabit damp soil under decks or porches, woodpiles, or leaf piles. They also live wherever pets spend a lot of time or where wild animals are nesting. 

Fleas that have found an entrance into a house will be in areas where pets (if you own them) spend a lot of time. They also are regularly found in rugs, upholstered furniture, our bedding, or in stored linens or towels.

How can I tell if my pet has fleas?

There are several signs that can indicate your pet has fleas:

  1. Itching and scratching: Flea bites can cause intense itching and scratching, so if your pet is excessively scratching or biting at their skin, it could be a sign of fleas.
  2. Biting or red spots on the skin: You may notice small, red bumps or spots on your pet's skin, which are caused by flea bites.
  3. Visible fleas or flea dirt: You may be able to see the fleas themselves, or their feces (also known as "flea dirt"), which looks like small, dark specks on your pet's skin or in their fur.
  4. Hair loss: In severe infestations, your pet may experience hair loss, due to excessive scratching and biting.
  5. Allergic dermatitis: Some pets can develop an allergic reaction to flea saliva, which can lead to red, irritated, and itchy skin.

It's important to check your pet regularly for fleas, by using a flea comb, which can help you pull fleas and flea dirt from the fur. Also, you can inspect your pet's skin, especially around the base of the tail and ears, where fleas are more likely to congregate.

How do I get rid of fleas?

Fleas are prolific breeders and are difficult pests to keep off our properties as wild animals are constantly introducing them there. At Miche Pest Control, we understand how frustrating fleas can be and will work with you to rid your property of these tiny terrors. 

By partnering with us, you will have peace of mind knowing that our experienced experts will eliminate fleas from your property and help you to prevent a re-infestation. We utilize effective and modern pest control methods and products to control fleas and other common household pests living in and around your home or business. 

If you live in our service areas of Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, D.C., contact Miche Pest Control today to learn more about our flea control services!

How can I get rid of fleas in my yard?

There are several ways to get rid of fleas in your yard:

  1. Mow the grass regularly: Fleas thrive in tall grass, so mowing your lawn regularly can help to reduce their population.
  2. Use insecticides: There are several insecticides that are specifically designed to kill fleas. These can be applied to your lawn and other outdoor areas to kill adult fleas and their larvae. Be sure to read and follow the instructions on the label carefully.
  3. Use nematodes: Nematodes are tiny, worm-like organisms that are natural predators of flea larvae. They can be purchased at many garden supply stores and applied to your lawn and other outdoor areas.
  4. Keep your yard clean: Fleas thrive in areas with high humidity and lots of debris, so keeping your yard clean and free of debris can help to reduce the number of fleas.
  5. Treat your pets: If you have pets, make sure to treat them with flea and tick control products to reduce the risk of them bringing fleas into your yard.
  6. Use a yard fogger: A yard fogger is a device that releases a fine mist of insecticide into the air to kill adult fleas and their larvae.

It's important to note that, while these methods can help to reduce the number of fleas in your yard, it may not be possible to completely eliminate them. Regularly treating your yard and pets with flea control products, and keeping your yard clean and free of debris, can help to prevent flea infestations.

What are some effective treatment options for fleas?

There are several effective treatment options for fleas, both for pets and for the home:

  1. Topical treatments: Topical treatments, such as sprays, shampoos, and spot-on treatments, are applied directly to the pet's skin. These products contain insecticides that kill fleas and ticks. They can be effective in preventing and treating flea infestations.
  2. Oral treatments: Oral medications, such as tablets and chews, are given to pets to ingest. They work by killing fleas and ticks as they bite the animal. These treatments can also be effective in preventing and treating flea infestations.
  3. Flea collars: Flea collars emit a low level of insecticide that helps repel or kill fleas and ticks. They are not as effective as topical or oral treatments, but they can provide an added layer of protection.
  4. Home sprays and powders: There are many sprays, powders and foggers available to treat the home that can help to kill fleas and their eggs. These products can be used to treat carpets, furniture and other areas where fleas may congregate.
  5. Consult with a vet: It's always good to consult with a veterinarian for the best treatment options for your pet, as some treatments may not be suitable for all pets, specially for those with health conditions or on certain medications.
  6. Combining treatments: Combining different treatment options can be more effective than relying on just one method. For example, using a flea collar in conjunction with a topical treatment or oral medication can provide an added layer of protection.

It's important to follow the instructions carefully when using any flea treatment, and to treat all pets in the household at the same time to avoid re-infestation.

Are there any natural or home remedies for flea control?

There are several natural or home remedies that can be used for flea control:

  1. Diatomaceous earth: Diatomaceous earth is a powder made from fossilized algae that can be spread on carpets, furniture, and other areas where fleas may be present. It works by dehydrating the fleas and their larvae, killing them.
  2. Essential oils: Certain essential oils, such as peppermint oil, eucalyptus oil, and citronella oil, can be used to repel fleas. They can be added to a carrier oil, such as coconut oil, and applied to your pets or used in a diffuser to repel fleas from your home.
  3. Flea comb: A flea comb can be used to remove fleas and their eggs from your pet's fur. Regularly combing your pet with a flea comb can help to reduce the number of fleas in your home.
  4. Boric acid: Boric acid is a natural flea control product that can be used to treat carpets, furniture, and other areas where fleas may be present. It works by dehydrating the fleas and their larvae, killing them.
  5. Vacuum: Regularly vacuuming your home can help to remove fleas and their eggs from carpets and furniture. Make sure to empty the vacuum cleaner bag or canister after each use.
  6. Neem oil: Neem oil can be used as a flea repellent for pets and humans, it can also be used to kill adult fleas and their larvae.

It's important to note that, while these remedies can be effective in controlling fleas, they may not completely eliminate them. Additionally, make sure to use them as directed and if using essential oils, make sure they are safe for pets and human. Consult with a veterinarian or other qualified professional before using these remedies, especially if you have any concerns about their safety or effectiveness.

How can I prevent fleas from infesting my home or pet?

Preventing problems with fleas is difficult, but we want to help you guard your property and pets against fleas by offering these helpful prevention tips:

  1. Keep your pet groomed: Regular grooming and brushing your pet can help remove fleas and their eggs from their fur. It is also a good idea to regularly bathe and groom your pets. Bathing your pet with flea shampoo can also help to kill fleas. Also, make sure to wash your pet's bedding regularly.
  2. Use flea prevention products: If you own pets, make sure to keep them up to date on a flea preventative. There are a variety of flea prevention products available for pets, including collars, sprays, and topical treatments. These products can help to repel or kill fleas before they have a chance to infest your pet.
  3. Clean and vacuum your home regularly: Fleas and their eggs can hide in carpets, bedding, and furniture, so it's important to vacuum and clean these areas regularly. Be sure to also dispose of the vacuum bag after each use to avoid re-infestation
  4. Treat your yard: Fleas can also live and thrive in outdoor areas, so it's important to treat your yard by mowing the lawn, removing piles of leaves and debris, and using a yard spray specifically designed to kill fleas. To get a quote for professional flea control services, contact us today.
  5. Check your pet for fleas before bringing them inside: Before bringing your pet inside, check them for fleas and ticks and remove any that you find.
  6. Keep wild animals away: Don’t encourage wildlife activity on your property. Fleas can also infest your house or pet through wild animals such as squirrels, raccoons or opossums, so keeping them away from your yard and house is important. Remove bird feeders and keep your yard free of the clutter that may attract rodents and other animals.
  7. After spending time outside, it is always a good idea to give yourself, your kids, and your pets a once over to look for fleas before going into your home.

By following these prevention steps, you can significantly reduce the risk of a flea infestation in your home and on your pet.

Can fleas survive in cold weather?

Fleas are ectothermic, which means that their body temperature is regulated by their environment. Cold temperatures can make it difficult for fleas to survive and reproduce, but they can still survive in cold weather to some extent.

Adult fleas can survive for short periods of time in temperatures as low as 32 degrees Fahrenheit, but prolonged exposure to cold temperatures can be lethal to them.

Flea eggs, larvae, and pupae are more resistant to cold temperatures. They can survive in temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit, but prolonged exposure to freezing temperatures can be lethal to them.

It's important to note that while cold temperatures can slow down or kill fleas, they do not eliminate them completely. Fleas can still survive indoors in warmer temperatures, so it's important to use flea control measures to prevent infestations even in cold weather.

Also, flea eggs, larvae, and pupae can survive in a variety of environments, such as carpets, furniture, and pet bedding, and can continue to develop and grow in these areas when temperatures outside are too cold for adult fleas to survive.

Therefore, it's important to apply flea control measures in both outdoor and indoor environment, especially during cold weather seasons.

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