Skip to Content
Call Us Today! 888-695-7722
Top
Flies

Flies

What Are Flies?

Flies are a diverse group of insects belonging to the order Diptera, which means "two wings." They are characterized by having two wings and a pair of halteres, small knob-like structures that help them balance in flight. Flies are found in nearly every habitat on earth, from deserts to the Arctic tundra, and play important roles in various ecosystems as both pollinators and decomposers.

There are over 150,000 known species of flies, with new species being discovered all the time. Some of the most common fly species include house flies, fruit flies, blow flies, and horse flies. Each species has its unique characteristics, behaviors, and habitats.

Flies are important pollinators, with some species specialized in pollinating specific plants. Some flies feed on nectar, while others are attracted to flowers because of their bright colors, strong smells, or UV patterns. Flies can also be important decomposers, as they lay their eggs on dead animals or organic waste, allowing their larvae to consume and break down the material.

Despite their important ecological roles, flies are also known for their nuisance and disease-carrying capabilities. House flies, for example, can transmit diseases such as salmonella and E. coli, while tsetse flies can transmit sleeping sickness. Mosquitoes, which are a type of fly, are known to spread diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, and Zika virus.

Flies have adapted to various environments and developed unique survival mechanisms. For example, some species have developed the ability to freeze themselves in the winter and thaw themselves in the spring, while others can survive in extreme heat and drought conditions. Some flies are also known for their impressive flying abilities, such as the hoverfly, which can hover in mid-air and even fly backward.

Types of Flies

Flies are a diverse group of insects belonging to the order Diptera. There are over 150,000 known species of flies, with new species being discovered all the time. Each species has its unique characteristics, behaviors, and habitats. Here are some of the most common types of flies:

Bee flies: Bee flies are small, flying insects that belong to the family Bombyliidae. They are often mistaken for bees or wasps but do not sting.

Black flies: Black flies are small, biting flies that belong to the family Simuliidae. They are often found near bodies of water and can be a nuisance to humans and animals.

Blowflies: Blowflies are medium-sized, flying insects that belong to the family Calliphoridae. They are often found near decaying animal matter and are important decomposers.

Cluster flies: Cluster flies are medium-sized, flying insects that belong to the family Pollenia. They are often found in homes and other buildings and can form large clusters in attics and other enclosed spaces.

Crane flies: Crane flies are harmless, mosquito-like insects with slender bodies, long legs, and non-feeding adults. They play a role in nutrient recycling.

Deer flies: Deer flies are large, biting flies that belong to the family Tabanidae. They are often found in wooded areas and feed on the blood of mammals and birds.

Drain flies: Drain flies are small, flying insects that belong to the family Psychodidae. They are often found near drains and can be a nuisance in homes and businesses.

Flesh Flies: Flesh flies, scientifically known as Sarcophagidae, are a diverse family of flies belonging to the order Diptera. They are commonly referred to as "flesh flies" due to their distinctive behavior of depositing their eggs on carrion, decaying organic matter, or open wounds, which serves as a primary food source for their larvae.

Fruit flies: Fruit flies are small, flying insects that belong to the family Drosophilidae. They are often attracted to ripe or fermenting fruit and are a common pest in homes and restaurants.

Fungus gnats: Fungus gnats are small, flying insects that belong to the family Sciaridae. They are often found in soil or compost and feed on fungi and decaying organic matter.

Gnats: Gnats are small, winged insects that belong to the family Mycetophilidae. They are often found near sources of moisture, such as damp soil or decaying plant material. While gnats are generally harmless to humans, they can be a nuisance when they swarm in large numbers.

Horse flies: Horse flies are large, biting flies that belong to the family Tabanidae. They are known for their painful bite and are often found near bodies of water, where they feed on the blood of mammals and birds.

House flies: House flies are medium-sized, flying insects that belong to the family Muscidae. They are often found near human habitation and can carry diseases such as salmonella and E. coli.

Hover flies: Hover flies are small, flying insects that belong to the family Syrphidae. They are often found near flowers and are important pollinators.

Mayflies: Mayflies are delicate, winged insects that belong to the order Ephemeroptera. They are often found near bodies of freshwater and are an important food source for fish and other aquatic animals.

Midges: Midges are small, non-biting flies that belong to the family Chironomidae. They are often found near bodies of water and can form large swarms that are a nuisance to humans.

What Do Flies Look Like?

Flies are small, flying insects belonging to the order Diptera. They come in various species, but they share some common physical characteristics. Here's what flies look like:

  • Size and Body Shape: Flies vary in size, but most are relatively small, typically measuring between 1/16 to 1/4 of an inch (1.5 to 6 millimeters). They have a distinctive body shape characterized by three main segments: the head, thorax, and abdomen. Their bodies are usually slender, and their head is separate from the thorax, connected by a short, flexible neck.
  • Wings: Flies have two membranous wings that are translucent or transparent, often with distinctive venation (vein-like patterns). These wings are used for flight, and they can beat rapidly, allowing flies to maneuver with agility.
  • Antennae: The majority of fly species have short, bristle-like antennae, typically consisting of three segments. These antennae are used for sensory perception.
  • Eyes: Flies are known for their large, prominent compound eyes, which often occupy a significant portion of their head. These compound eyes are made up of numerous tiny lenses, providing them with a wide field of vision.
  • Mouthparts: Flies have specialized mouthparts that are adapted for their feeding habits. They often have a sponging or piercing-sucking mouthpart, depending on the species. Some flies, like house flies, have sponging mouthparts for feeding on liquid substances, while others, like mosquitoes, have piercing-sucking mouthparts for blood-feeding.
  • Coloration: The coloration of flies can vary widely between species. Common house flies are gray or black, while others may have distinctive patterns or bright colors. The exact coloration is often species-specific.
  • Legs: Flies have six slender legs, each ending in a claw or adhesive pads, which enable them to land on and grip surfaces.
  • Reproductive Structures: Female flies possess ovipositors for laying eggs. These structures can be quite specialized and differ between species.

There are over 150,000 species of flies, and the specific characteristics can vary significantly among them. Flies play various roles in ecosystems, including pollination and decomposition, but some are pests, with many being known as disease vectors.

Where Are Flies Found?

Flies can be found in a wide range of environments and habitats due to their adaptability and diverse dietary preferences. Here are some common places where flies might be found:

Homes:

  • Kitchens: Flies, such as fruit flies and house flies, are often found in kitchens, where they are attracted to food scraps, overripe fruits, and unsealed food containers.
  • Garbage Bins: House flies are commonly associated with garbage bins, as they are attracted to decaying organic matter.

Outdoors:

  • Gardens: Flies like flower flies and hoverflies can be found in gardens, where they feed on nectar and pollen while serving as pollinators for many plants.
  • Compost Bins: Compost bins are attractive to a variety of fly species, as they provide a rich source of decaying organic matter.
  • Animal Farms: Fly species like stable flies and horseflies are often found around animal farms and stables, where they can feed on the blood of livestock.

Natural Environments:

  • Aquatic Habitats: Mosquitoes, a type of fly, lay their eggs in stagnant water, such as ponds, marshes, and puddles.
  • Forests: Flies are present in forest ecosystems, including saprophagous species that feed on decaying organic matter.
  • Fields: Flies can be found in open fields, where they may feed on nectar, plant sap, or prey on other insects.

Waste and Decomposing Matter:

  • Dumpsters and Landfills: Flies, especially house flies, are often found around dumpsters and landfills, where they are attracted to decomposing waste.
  • Carcasses: Blow flies and flesh flies are attracted to animal carcasses, where they lay their eggs and their larvae feed on the decaying flesh.

Indoor Environments:

  • Hospitals: In healthcare facilities, flies can be a concern due to the potential transmission of diseases. Proper sanitation and pest control measures are essential in such environments.
  • Restaurants: Flies are a common pest in restaurants, as they are attracted to food scraps and unclean environments.
  • Bathrooms: Drain flies, also known as sewer flies, can be found in bathrooms, particularly around drains and pipes.

Animal Habitats:

  • Livestock and Animal Shelters: Flies that feed on the blood of animals, such as stable flies, can be found in and around animal shelters and livestock facilities.

The presence of flies in these locations can vary depending on factors like climate, season, and local conditions. Effective pest management and sanitation practices are often employed to control fly populations in areas where they pose a nuisance or a health risk.

What Is The Life Cycle Of Flies?

The life cycle of a typical fly, such as the common house fly (Musca domestica), consists of four main stages: egg, larva (maggot), pupa, and adult. Here is the life cycle of a fly:

Egg Stage:

  • The life cycle begins when an adult female fly lays eggs.
  • House flies, for example, can lay multiple batches of eggs, each containing around 75 to 150 eggs.
  • The eggs are often laid in decaying organic matter, feces, or other suitable breeding sites.
  • The egg stage typically lasts for approximately 12 to 24 hours.

Larval Stage (Maggot):

  • Once the eggs hatch, they give rise to the larval stage, commonly known as maggots.
  • Maggots are legless, soft-bodied, and worm-like, and they have a voracious appetite.
  • During this stage, the maggots feed on the decaying organic matter, breaking it down and facilitating decomposition.
  • The duration of the larval stage varies but typically lasts for 3-7 days, depending on environmental conditions and fly species.

Pupal Stage:

  • After the larval stage, the maggots enter the pupal stage.
  • In this stage, the larvae transform into pupae, enclosed in a protective outer casing.
  • Pupation typically lasts for 3-5 days, during which the fly undergoes metamorphosis, developing into an adult.

Adult Stage:

  • When the pupal development is complete, the adult fly emerges from the pupa.
  • The adult fly is the final stage of the life cycle, and it is the one most familiar to us.
  • The adult fly's primary activities are to find food sources, mate, and lay eggs to continue the life cycle.
  • The adult stage usually lasts for about 15 to 25 days, although this can vary depending on environmental factors and fly species.

The life cycle of a fly is relatively short, and the primary purpose of an adult fly's life is to reproduce and contribute to the population. Environmental conditions, such as temperature, humidity, and the availability of food and breeding sites, can significantly affect the duration of each life cycle stage and the overall lifespan of flies.

Learn more: How Long Do Flies Live?

Learn more: What Is The Lifespan Of A Fly?

Fly Diet

Flies are opportunistic feeders with a diverse diet. Their feeding habits vary depending on the specific type of fly and their life stage. Here is what flies eat:

Adult Flies:

  • Nectar and Pollen: Many adult flies, including various species of house flies, fruit flies, and flower flies, feed on nectar and pollen. They are important pollinators for some plants.
  • Decaying Organic Matter: Flies are attracted to decaying organic matter, such as rotting fruits, vegetables, and animal carcasses. They lay their eggs in these materials and also feed on them.
  • Sugary Substances: Some flies are attracted to sugary substances like spilled juices, soda, and other sweet liquids.
  • Human and Animal Food: House flies are notorious for feeding on human and animal food, including sugary and savory items. They can transmit diseases by landing on food and transferring pathogens from other contaminated surfaces.
  • Blood: Certain fly species, like blood-feeding horse flies, tsetse flies, and sand flies, feed on the blood of mammals, birds, or even reptiles.
  • Other Insects: Some fly species are predators and feed on other insects. Robber flies, for example, capture and consume other flying insects in mid-air.

Larval Flies (Maggots):

  • Decomposing Matter: Fly larvae, often called maggots, primarily feed on decaying organic matter. This includes rotting fruits, vegetables, animal carcasses, and compost.
  • Plant Roots: Some fly larvae, such as root maggots, burrow into plant roots and feed on plant tissues.
  • Parasitism: Certain fly larvae are parasitic. For example, botfly larvae are internal parasites of mammals, while some species of tachinid flies are parasitoids of other insects.

The diet of flies plays a significant role in their ecological niche and can impact human health and agriculture. Some fly species are associated with the transmission of diseases due to their feeding habits, particularly when they come into contact with human food or waste. Effective fly control and sanitation measures are often used to mitigate these concerns.

Learn more: What Do Flies Eat?


Continue Reading Read Less

Hear From Our Happy Customers

  • "Professional & Considerate"

    I’m pleased with Miche services. Jarvis came today. Professional and considerate. Thank you!

    - Judy B.
  • "Very Knowledgeable"

    The tech that arrived was courteous, professional, and very knowledgeable. He was Great.

    - Uerial I.
  • "Exceeds Expectations"

    I can’t say enough positive things about this company... The tech that came out, Jarvis went above and beyond my expectations. Thank you guys, I will continue using your services.

    - Jake M.
  • "Fantastic & Patient"

    Jarvis was fantastic and patient. He answered my questions with an in-depth explanation and addressed all of my areas of concern. Would love for him to be my assigned tech going forward. Well done!

    - Yonnette M.
  • "Wonderful Service"

    Wonderful service. Jarvis is great. Took care of everything I needed. Thank you!

    - Henry P.
  • "Great Communication"

    Tech was on time, communication was great, and he accommodated my needs.

    - Alonzo W.

Are Flies Dangerous?

Flies can be potentially dangerous, primarily due to their role as disease vectors and their ability to contaminate food and surfaces. Here are some of the potential dangers associated with flies:

  • Disease Transmission: Flies, such as house flies and some species of mosquitoes, can carry and transmit a variety of diseases. For example, house flies can pick up pathogens from decaying organic matter, feces, and garbage and then transfer these pathogens to human food or surfaces they come into contact with. Diseases that flies can transmit include foodborne illnesses like salmonella and E. coli, as well as diseases like cholera, dysentery, and eye infections. Mosquitoes, which are a type of fly, are known for transmitting diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, Zika virus, and West Nile virus.
  • Contamination of Food: Flies are often attracted to food sources, and when they land on food, they can transfer bacteria and other pathogens from their bodies or from the surfaces they've previously visited. This can lead to foodborne illnesses if the contaminated food is consumed.
  • Crop Damage: Certain species of flies, such as fruit flies, can damage crops by feeding on plant tissues or by acting as vectors for plant diseases. This can result in economic losses for agricultural industries.
  • Nuisance and Allergies: Flies can be a general nuisance, especially in areas with high fly populations. Their constant buzzing and presence can be irritating. In addition, some people may be allergic to fly saliva or feces, which can cause skin reactions or respiratory issues.
  • Secondary Infections: In some cases, flies can be associated with secondary infections. For example, fly larvae (maggots) can infest open wounds or decaying tissue, potentially leading to additional health complications.

To mitigate the potential dangers associated with flies, it's important to practice good sanitation and hygiene measures, such as proper food storage, waste disposal, and the use of insect screens. Pest control methods, like fly traps and insecticides, can also be employed to reduce fly populations and their impact on human health and agriculture. It's essential to be aware of the specific species of flies in your environment and take appropriate measures to prevent and manage any associated risks.

Learn more: Do Flies Bite?


Continue Reading Read Less

Frequently Asked Questions About Flies

What do fly eggs look like?

Fly eggs are small, typically oval or elongated, and translucent or white in color. They are often laid in clusters and can be found on decaying organic matter.

Learn more: What Do Fly Eggs Look Like?

How to get rid of flies?

To get rid of flies, use fly traps, maintain a clean environment, seal entry points, and consider using insecticides or natural repellents as needed.

Learn more: How To Get Rid Of Flies

Contact Miche Pest Control Today!

  • Please enter your first name.
  • Please enter your last name.
  • Please enter your phone number.
    This isn't a valid phone number.
  • Please enter your email address.
    This isn't a valid email address.
  • Please lookup your address.
  • Please make a selection.
  • Please make a selection.
  • Please enter a message.
  • By submitting, you agree to be contacted about your request & other information using automated technology. Message frequency varies. Msg & data rates may apply. Text STOP to cancel. Acceptable Use Policy